15 Comments

  1. Hi. I happened upon your blog, and thought I would take a moment to wish you good luck on your publishing endeavors. I scrolled down your page a bit and read that a sample of your manuscript had been requested, so congrats on that, too. I’m seeking publication myself, although I only sent my first query out a couple of weeks ago.

    Again, good luck to you, and if you don’t mind, I’ll pop in from time to time to see how things are going.

    SS

  2. Hey there…sorry I’ve been remiss in my commenting…busy, you know…

    Personally, I think that genre-defying thing is a good thing and makes your work more marketable…makes you more marketable. I’ve never really understood the obsession publishing peeps have with such things. If something is good, chances are it doesn’t matter to the reader. But, then again, I’ve never seen much use for agents. No one I know can sell my work better than my work itself. That includes me.

  3. GOTHAMGIRL

    Gone With The Wind. I know your list was short but for cryin in a bucket, every time they calculate movie ticket prices of then and now Gone With The Wind remains on top.

    Since you want to be a name brand anyway, you could retitle the book “Buy This Book.” Hey Coka-Cola’s best advertisement campaighn was simply “Drink Coke.”

    Okay, genres suck. So do taxes, death, and politics. What’s your genere for this book? (since your adamant about it not being science fiction because it invovles time travel.) I’m just curious. (what else is new?) If it’s inbetween genres perhaps you should seek out agents that have handled books inbetween genres, assuming of course you haven’t already thought of that.

  4. Hi Will,

    We have so much in common. I was aiming for paranormal romance, but my last novel just kept falling too far outside that genre’s box. We tried marketing it as a “time thriller” to sci-fi and mainstream houses, but there was too much romance. I thought spanning the chasm of genres makes an author more marketable, but that only happens with established authors. No house wants to take a chance on a new author they don’t know where to shelve or how to promote.

    The Time Traveler’s Wife was originally a small press book, picked up for its lyrical, quasi-literary tone. I’m glad it found success in mainstream. To be a debut author in mainstream, which is almost impossible, an author has to have a crazy out-there voice or concept that pushes the boundaries. I’m convinced it’s easier to get published in genre, gain an audience and sales record, then stretch a bit into the direction the author really wants to go.

    I wish you all the best with your submissions. I’m subscribing so I can celebrate with you when you get that contract 🙂

  5. @Alma: nice to see you back. Been a while! I’m trying to understand, but it’s difficult, sometimes.

    @Gotham: well, I was going by the IMDb, but even with adjusted gross (when GWtW is on top), still 9 of the top 20 are genre (horror and sci-fi), with several being animated.

    And like I said, so far, I’m going with techno-thrillers with the caveat that it’s more commercial fiction.

  6. @LA: hi! You slipped right by my last comment, so I didn’t see it before I responded. And I totally hear you about being a new author trying to find a place. I was going to say it’s so frustrating being one, but truthfully, I’m not sure it ever truly changes.

    I actually met the guy who bought The Time-Traveler’s Wife for Harcourt (his name escapes me now). Good guy. I’m not sure about your conviction to start genre if only because: if you get picked up in science fiction and then write a fantasy, I think a publisher would attempt to dissuade you from writing, say, a mystery. Or some suchlike.

    Anyway, thanks for the luck, and glad to have you aboard!

  7. GOTHAMGIRL

    I realise this is kinda a closed topic, as in no one else will comment, but I ofund this quote and though you should see it too.

    “Seperating section at a book store keeps people from reading books they would love…A good book is a good book for any age” -Stephenie Meyer

  8. GOTHAMGIRL

    Whose books have made the New York times best seller list as well as a movie deal. Hey aren’t you a fan of some kid’s book about wizards? Harry Potter right? I don’t think you have the right to judge.

    I found a quote that went along with what your saying and you through it back. Do you not like quotes or something?

  9. @Gotham: “Whose books have made the New York times best seller list as well as a movie deal.” But that was my point! I wasn’t throwing anything back. The point of the post is that genre is usually just a marketing term, and scifi and fantasy are totally mainstream. Which you corroborated, because young-adult fantasy horror vampire books are selling like hotcakes and about to become a movie.

  10. GOTHAMGIRL

    “right, said the young adult fantasy horror vampire writer.”

    “But that was my point! I wasn’t throwing anything back. The point of the post is that genre is usually just a marketing term, and scifi and fantasy are totally mainstream. Which you corroborated, because young-adult fantasy horror vampire books are selling like hotcakes and about to become a movie.”

    Uh-huh. Your first statement didn’t really express what your second statement did. I’ll trust you though.

  11. Hey, I just stumbled across this post and wanted to wish you the best of luck! I COMPLETELY understand where you’re coming from on two fronts:

    1) I started my “adult” reading with Stephen King

    2) When it came time to shop my first novel, I was very worried about how to label it because it crossed boundaries… AND my next two books (already in the works at that time) were definitely in different genres than the first, so I knew publishers wouldn’t be pleased with me trying to “break out of my box.” 🙂

    Good luck and best of luck!

  12. @Writingrunner: Welcome! Nice to have you, and hope you’ll stick around. And yeah, totally with you on different genres.

    Thanks for the luck, and right back atchya!

  13. J

    Hi

    Stumbling late on this to but an interesting post. I’m still a long long way from ever being published but it’s made me think about the sort of stories I write. I tend to write stories with an element of time travel but they are resolutely not science fiction more historical adventure stories, I hope that’s not going to ‘confuse’ publishers.

    I agree with what you said about Neil Gaiman (I was tag surfing Neil Gaiman), I only ever venture into the fantasy part of the store to find his books and really he should be in a category of his own because he’s not as fantasy like as some of those orcs and trolls books out there. I think book stores should just put all good books together.

    On changing genres after already having published something, I was most alarmed at one writers talk I went to, there was one lady who had written a successful series of books based in one particular continent, she then wanted to write about somewhere else (who’d blame her, I’d get bored writing about the same place all the time) and her publishers didn’t want it. It took a long long time for her to get published again apparently.

    J.

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